The Schengen Agreement, which enables free movement of people across most of the European Union’s member states, has been temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The move has caused concern among citizens and businesses, as it affects travel, trade, and the functioning of the EU economy.

What is the Schengen Agreement?

The Schengen Agreement, signed in 1985 between five EU member states, aimed to eliminate internal border controls and allow free movement of citizens within the EU. Today, the agreement includes 26 countries, including non-EU countries like Norway and Switzerland.

The suspension of the Schengen Agreement

On March 17, 2020, the EU Commission issued a recommendation for EU member states to suspend non-essential travel to the EU for at least 30 days and to temporarily suspend the Schengen Agreement. The decision was followed by most EU member states, including France, Germany, Italy, and Spain, who reintroduced border controls.

The suspension of the Schengen Agreement has caused difficulty for many individuals and businesses, as it restricts cross-border movement and affects trade and tourism. With the temporary closure of borders, people who regularly work or study in another EU country are finding it difficult to continue their activities.

Businesses that rely on cross-border trade are also finding it challenging to operate, as the free movement of goods is restricted. The temporary closure of borders has disrupted supply chains and increased costs for companies that need to move goods across countries.

The impact of the suspension of the Schengen Agreement

The temporary suspension of the Schengen Agreement has had a significant impact on the EU economy. The travel and tourism industry has been hit hard, with a decline in the number of tourists visiting the EU. The closure of borders has led to the cancellation of many flights and the closure of many hotels and restaurants.

The suspension has also affected trade and the functioning of the EU economy. With the closure of borders, the movement of goods has been restricted, leading to supply chain disruptions and increased costs for businesses.

In conclusion, the suspension of the Schengen Agreement has had a significant impact on the EU economy. The temporary closure of borders has affected travel, trade, and the functioning of the EU economy. The decision to suspend the agreement was necessary to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus, but it has caused concern among many individuals and businesses. As the situation continues to evolve, it remains to be seen how long the Schengen Agreement will remain suspended and what its long-term impact will be on the EU and its member states.